An incorrect intramuscular injection occurs when a syringe is used to administer medication into the wrong muscle group. This can result in pain, bruising, and bleeding at the injection site. There are several reasons why an incorrect intramuscular injection might occur.

Sometimes, it is simply a mistake that is made by the person administering the injection. Other times, it may be due to a miscommunication between the person administering the injection and the person receiving it.

In this article, we will discuss the most common causes of an incorrect intramuscular injection and provide a brief overview of this topic.

What is an Intramuscular Injection?

An intramuscular injection is a method of delivering medication into the body. The medication is injected into the muscle tissue, where it is then absorbed into the bloodstream.

Intramuscular injections are used to deliver medications that cannot be taken orally, such as certain types of antibiotics and pain relievers.

They are also used to deliver vaccines, such as the flu vaccine. Intramuscular injections are generally safe and effective, but there is a risk of complications, such as pain, bruising, and infection.

injection syringe hand

Intramuscular Injection Sites

There are several sites on the body that can be used for intramuscular injections, including the following:

  • Deltoid (arm)
  • Vastus lateralis (thigh)
  • Ventrogluteal (hip)
  • Dorsogluteal (buttocks)

Intramuscular injections are usually given with a needle and syringe. The needle should be of the correct size and length for the medication being injected. The syringe should be filled with the correct amount of medication.

Intramuscular Injection Sites

Incorrect Intramuscular Injection

If a medication is administered into the wrong muscle, this is known as an incorrect intramuscular injection.

This can happen if the person administering the injection is not properly trained or if they do not have the correct supplies. Incorrect intramuscular injections are relatively uncommon, but they can occur.

Intramuscular injections are generally safe, but there is a risk of complications, such as pain, bruising, and infection. If a medication is injected into the wrong muscle, this can increase the risk of complications.

Signs of an Incorrect Intramuscular Injection

There are several signs that may indicate an incorrect intramuscular injection, including:

  • Pain at the injection site
  • Swelling or bruising at the injection site
  • Redness or warmth at the injection site

These signs may indicate that the needle has entered a blood vessel, which can cause bruising and pain. In some cases, an incorrect intramuscular injection can also cause an infection.

How to Prevent Incorrect Intramuscular Injections?

There are several steps that can be taken to prevent incorrect intramuscular injections, including:

  • Using the correct needle and syringe size
  • Using the correct injection site
  • Using sterile supplies
  • Following proper injection technique

These steps can help to ensure that the medication is injected into the correct muscle. In addition, it is important to make sure that the person administering the injection is properly trained.

Patient getting vaccine injection

FAQ

What is the Most Common Cause of an Incorrect Intramuscular Injection?

The most common cause of an incorrect intramuscular injection is a mistake made by the person administering the injection. Other causes include miscommunication between the person administering the injection and the person receiving it or using the wrong supplies.

What are the Signs of an Incorrect Intramuscular Injection?

The signs of an incorrect intramuscular injection include pain, swelling, bruising, and redness at the injection site. In some cases, an incorrect intramuscular injection can also cause an infection.

What Should I Do if I Receive an Incorrect Intramuscular Injection?

If you receive an incorrect intramuscular injection, you should seek medical attention immediately.

You may need to be treated for pain, swelling, or infection. In some cases, an incorrect intramuscular injection can also cause serious complications, such as tissue damage or organ damage.

What are the Complications of an Incorrect Intramuscular Injection?

The complications of an incorrect intramuscular injection include pain, swelling, bruising, and infection. In some cases, an incorrect intramuscular injection can also cause serious complications, such as tissue damage or organ damage.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, incorrect intramuscular injections are relatively uncommon, but they can occur. If a medication is injected into the wrong muscle, this can increase the risk of complications.

There are several steps that can be taken to prevent incorrect intramuscular injections, including using the correct needle and syringe size, using the correct injection site, and following the proper injection techniques.

Thanks for reading and, as always, breathe easy, my friend.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

References

The following are the sources that were used while doing research for this article:

  • Bancsi, Ashley, et al. “Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration and Other Injection Site Events.” National Library of Medicine, Can Fam Physician, Jan. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347325.
  • Gutierrez, Javier J. Polania, and Sunil Munakomi. “Intramuscular Injection.” National Library of Medicine, 6 Feb. 2022, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK556121.
  • Nicoll, Leslie H., and Amy Hesby. “Intramuscular Injection: An Integrative Research Review and Guideline for Evidence-Based Practice.” National Library of Medicine, Appl Nurs Res, Aug. 2002, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12173166
  • Nakajima, Yukari, et al. “Establishing a New Appropriate Intramuscular Injection Site in the Deltoid Muscle.” National Library of Medicine, Hum Vaccin Immunother, July 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5612213.

Medical Disclaimer: The information provided by Respiratory Therapy Zone is for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition.