What is lung compliance vector

What is Lung Compliance? (2024)

by | Updated: Apr 19, 2024

Lung compliance, a critical aspect of respiratory physiology, refers to the lung’s ability to stretch and expand. In simpler terms, it measures the ease with which the lungs can be inflated.

This property is vital for effective breathing and is influenced by several factors, including the elasticity of lung tissues and the surface tension within the alveoli.

Understanding lung compliance is crucial for diagnosing and managing various respiratory conditions, as it affects the lung’s capacity to hold air and the effort required for breathing.

This article provides a comprehensive overview of lung compliance and its clinical significance in respiratory health.

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What is Lung Compliance?

Lung compliance refers to the ability of the lungs to stretch and expand in response to pressure changes during breathing. It is a measure of the lung’s elasticity and flexibility.

In more technical terms, lung compliance is defined as the change in lung volume per unit change in transpulmonary pressure (the pressure difference between the inside of the lungs and the pressure in the pleural cavity).

Lung compliance expansion vector illustration

Factors Affecting Lung Compliance

There are two key factors that can influence lung compliance:

  1. Elastic Properties of Lung Tissues: This includes the tissues of the lungs themselves and the connective tissues. Healthy lung tissues are highly elastic, meaning they can easily stretch during inhalation and return to their original shape during exhalation. Diseases that cause stiffening or scarring of lung tissue, like pulmonary fibrosis, can reduce lung compliance.
  2. Surface Tension in the Alveoli: The alveoli are the small air sacs in the lungs where gas exchange occurs. They are lined with a thin layer of fluid, which creates surface tension. This surface tension needs to be overcome to expand the alveoli during inhalation. Surfactant, a substance produced by the lungs, reduces this surface tension and helps maintain lung compliance. Conditions that affect surfactant production or function, like Respiratory Distress Syndrome in newborns, can also affect lung compliance.

High lung compliance means the lungs can easily expand, requiring less force to inhale. Conversely, low lung compliance means the lungs are stiff and require more effort to expand during inhalation.

This can make breathing more laborious and less efficient.

In clinical practice, measuring lung compliance can help diagnose and monitor various lung conditions.

It provides valuable information about the lung’s mechanical properties and can guide treatment decisions in diseases that affect lung elasticity or surfactant production.

Lung Compliance Calculation

Lung compliance is calculated by measuring the change in lung volume relative to the change in transpulmonary pressure.

Transpulmonary pressure is the difference between the pressure inside the lungs (intrapulmonary pressure) and the pressure outside the lungs in the pleural space (intrapleural pressure).

The formula for lung compliance (C) is:

C = ΔV / ΔP​

Where:

  • C is lung compliance.
  • ΔV is the change in lung volume (typically measured in liters or milliliters).
  • ΔP is the change in transpulmonary pressure (measured in centimeters of water, cm H2O, or millimeters of mercury, mmHg).

To calculate lung compliance, a spirometer is used to measure the change in lung volume during breathing. The transpulmonary pressure is measured using a manometer.

For instance, if the lung volume changes by 0.5 liters (500 ml) when the transpulmonary pressure changes by 5 cm H2O, the lung compliance would be:

C = (0.5 / 5) = 0.1 L/cmH2O

This calculation reflects the lungs’ ability to stretch. Higher values indicate more compliant (easily stretched) lungs, while lower values indicate stiffer lungs.

Clinically, this is significant as it helps in diagnosing and managing various respiratory conditions.

For example, lower compliance might be seen in diseases like pulmonary fibrosis, while higher compliance might be observed in conditions like emphysema.

Types of Lung Compliance

Lung compliance can be classified into two primary types: static compliance and dynamic compliance.

These two types help assess different aspects of lung mechanics and are important in the clinical understanding of respiratory function.

Static Compliance

Static compliance refers to the compliance of the lung when no air is moving in or out, that is, at the end of inspiration or expiration. It is measured during periods of no airflow, such as at the end of a breath hold.

This measurement isolates the elastic properties of the lung and chest wall, eliminating factors related to airway resistance.

It is calculated by dividing the change in lung volume by the change in transpulmonary pressure at a constant volume.

Cstat = Vt / (Pplat – PEEP)

Where:

  • Cstat is static compliance.
  • Vt is tidal volume.
  • Pplat is plateau pressure.
  • PEEP is positive end-expiratory pressure.

Static compliance is particularly useful in assessing conditions that alter the lung tissue’s elasticity, such as pulmonary fibrosis or emphysema.

Dynamic Compliance

Dynamic compliance is measured during periods of airflow, that is, during actual breathing. It takes into account both the elasticity of the lungs and the resistance to air flow in the airways.

Dynamic compliance is calculated by dividing the change in lung volume by the change in transpulmonary pressure during active inhalation or exhalation.

Cdyn = Vt / (PIP – PEEP)

Where:

  • Cdyn is dynamic compliance.
  • Vt is tidal volume.
  • PIP is peak inspiratory pressure.
  • PEEP is positive end-expiratory pressure.

It is affected by factors like airway resistance and the rate of breathing. Conditions like asthma, which increase airway resistance, can significantly affect dynamic compliance.

Note: Understanding both static and dynamic compliance is important for diagnosing and managing various respiratory conditions. Static compliance helps assess the structural properties of the lung and chest wall, while dynamic compliance provides insight into how diseases affecting airway resistance impact lung function during breathing. 

What is Transmural Pressure?

Transmural pressure is a crucial concept that helps in understanding how the lungs expand and contract during breathing. It is the pressure difference across the lung wall and plays a key role in the mechanics of lung expansion.

The transmural pressure gradient is essentially the difference between the pressure inside the alveoli (intrapulmonary or alveolar pressure) and the pressure in the pleural cavity (intrapleural pressure).

This pressure difference is what keeps the lungs inflated and is critical for the process of ventilation.

  • Alveolar Pressure: This is the pressure within the airways and alveoli of the lungs. During inhalation, this pressure decreases as the lungs expand, drawing air in. During exhalation, it increases as the lungs recoil, pushing air out.
  • Intrapleural Pressure: This is the pressure in the pleural cavity, the thin space between the lung surface and the chest wall. Intrapleural pressure is normally negative relative to atmospheric pressure, which creates a suction effect that keeps the lungs expanded against the chest wall.
  • Transmural Pressure Gradient: This represents the net force acting to expand the lung at any given moment. A positive transmural pressure indicates that the pressure inside the alveoli is greater than the intrapleural pressure, leading to lung expansion. Conversely, if the transmural pressure becomes negative (such as in cases of pneumothorax, where air enters the pleural space), the lung can collapse.

In the study of lung compliance, transmural pressure is an important factor.

High lung compliance means that a small change in transmural pressure causes a large change in lung volume, indicating that the lungs are easily stretchable.

Low lung compliance means that a larger change in transmural pressure is needed to produce the same change in lung volume, indicating stiffer lungs.

This concept is essential in understanding various clinical scenarios in pulmonology, including conditions like acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pulmonary fibrosis, and emphysema, all of which can alter lung compliance and hence affect the transmural pressure gradient needed for effective ventilation.

What is Elastin?

Elastin is a key protein found in the connective tissues of the lungs, vital for their elastic properties. This protein allows the lung tissue to stretch and recoil, which is essential for normal breathing.

When you inhale, elastin fibers stretch, and during exhalation, they help the lungs return to their resting state.

The balance of elastin in lung tissues contributes to the lung’s ability to expand and contract efficiently, thereby influencing lung compliance.

Diseases that affect elastin integrity, such as emphysema, often lead to reduced lung elasticity and compliance. In such conditions, the lungs lose their ability to recoil effectively, impacting breathing efficiency and gas exchange.

What is Surface Tension?

Surface tension refers to the force exerted by the liquid lining of the alveoli, the tiny air sacs in the lungs where gas exchange occurs.

This liquid layer, primarily water, creates surface tension, a force that tends to make the alveoli contract and resist expansion.

High surface tension decreases lung compliance, making it harder for the lungs to expand during inhalation. To counteract this, the lungs produce surfactant, a substance that reduces surface tension, thereby increasing lung compliance.

Surfactant is crucial for efficient lung function, as it lowers the effort required to expand the lungs.

Note: Inadequate surfactant production, as seen in conditions like neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, can lead to increased surface tension and significantly impair lung compliance.

Pathophysiology of Lung Compliance

The pathophysiology of lung compliance involves understanding how various diseases and conditions affect the lungs’ ability to expand and contract.

Lung compliance is influenced by the elasticity of the lung tissues and the surface tension in the alveoli. Changes in either of these factors can lead to altered lung compliance.

  • Decreased Compliance: Diseases that cause stiffening or scarring of the lung tissue, such as pulmonary fibrosis, lead to decreased lung compliance. In these conditions, the lung tissue loses its elasticity, becoming rigid and difficult to expand. This increases the work of breathing and reduces the efficiency of gas exchange.
  • Increased Compliance: On the other hand, conditions like emphysema, part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lead to increased lung compliance. In emphysema, the alveolar walls are destroyed, which increases the lung volume but reduces the elastic recoil. This makes it easier for the lungs to expand but harder to expel air, leading to air trapping.
  • Surfactant Deficiency: The surface tension within the alveoli can significantly affect lung compliance. Surfactant, a substance that reduces surface tension, is crucial for keeping the alveoli open. In conditions like neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, there is a deficiency of surfactant, leading to increased surface tension and decreased lung compliance. This makes the lungs stiff and hard to inflate.
  • Altered Surfactant Function: Certain lung infections or inhalation injuries can alter the function or composition of surfactant, impacting lung compliance.
  • Chest Wall Compliance: The compliance of the chest wall itself also affects overall lung compliance. Conditions that stiffen the chest wall, such as severe kyphoscoliosis or obesity, can restrict lung expansion.
  • Age-Related Changes: Aging can also affect lung compliance. Elderly individuals often have decreased chest wall compliance and changes in lung tissue elasticity.

Note: In clinical practice, understanding the pathophysiology of lung compliance is essential for diagnosing, treating, and managing respiratory diseases. It provides insight into the mechanical functioning of the lungs and helps tailor therapeutic interventions, especially in ventilatory support and management of chronic respiratory conditions.

FAQs About Lung Compliance

What Can Affect Lung Compliance?

Lung compliance can be influenced by several factors, including the elasticity of lung tissue, the surface tension within the alveoli, and the presence of any structural abnormalities or lung diseases.

Any condition or factor that alters these components can impact lung compliance.

Why is Lung Compliance Higher During Expiration?

Lung compliance tends to be higher during expiration because, during this phase of breathing, the elastic recoil forces of the lungs and chest wall work together to push air out.

This cooperation between the two structures reduces the resistance to airflow and makes it easier for the lungs to expel air, resulting in increased compliance.

Why Does Lung Compliance Decrease in Restrictive Lung Diseases?

Lung compliance decreases in restrictive lung diseases due to changes in lung tissue or chest wall that restrict the ability of the lungs to expand.

Conditions like pulmonary fibrosis or scoliosis can reduce lung compliance by making the lung tissue stiffer or by limiting the chest wall’s expansion.

How to Calculate Lung Compliance?

Lung compliance can be calculated by dividing the change in lung volume by the change in transpulmonary pressure (the pressure difference across the lung).

The formula for lung compliance is C = ΔV/ΔP, where C represents lung compliance, ΔV is the change in lung volume, and ΔP is the change in transpulmonary pressure.

Typically, compliance is measured in milliliters per centimeter of water (ml/cm H2O).

Does Lung Compliance Decrease with Age?

Yes, lung compliance tends to decrease with age. As individuals get older, the lung tissues can become less elastic, and the chest wall may become less flexible.

These age-related changes can result in reduced lung compliance, making it harder for older individuals to breathe deeply and efficiently.

Why Does Lung Compliance Increase with Emphysema?

Lung compliance increases in emphysema primarily due to the destruction of lung tissue. In emphysema, the walls of the alveoli break down, creating larger, less rigid air spaces.

This results in increased lung compliance, making it easier for the lungs to expand and take in air. However, this increased compliance also leads to reduced elastic recoil and impaired gas exchange.

How Does Surfactant Affect Lung Compliance?

Surfactant is a substance produced by the alveoli in the lungs that reduces surface tension within the alveoli. By lowering surface tension, surfactant prevents the collapse of small air sacs during exhalation.

This action reduces the work required to expand the lungs during inhalation, increasing lung compliance and promoting more efficient breathing.

Why is Lung Compliance Important?

Lung compliance is crucial because it determines how easily the lungs can expand and contract during the breathing process.

It directly affects an individual’s ability to inhale and exhale, and it plays a vital role in maintaining proper gas exchange within the lungs.

Understanding lung compliance is essential for diagnosing and managing various respiratory conditions, as deviations from normal compliance can indicate the presence of lung diseases or other health issues.

Final Thoughts

Lung compliance is a fundamental aspect of respiratory physiology that directly impacts our ability to breathe and maintain proper oxygen exchange.

Whether in the context of healthy lungs or in the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory disorders, the concept of lung compliance remains essential.

A thorough understanding of lung compliance enables healthcare professionals to provide more effective care and improve the quality of life for individuals with respiratory conditions.

John Landry, BS, RRT

Written by:

John Landry, BS, RRT

John Landry is a registered respiratory therapist from Memphis, TN, and has a bachelor's degree in kinesiology. He enjoys using evidence-based research to help others breathe easier and live a healthier life.

References

  • Desai JP, Moustarah F. Pulmonary Compliance. [Updated 2022 Sep 12]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-.
  • Neupane K, Jamil RT. Physiology, Transpulmonary Pressure. [Updated 2023 May 1]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-.
  • Mecham RP. Elastin in lung development and disease pathogenesis. Matrix Biol. 2018 Nov
  • Seadler BD, Toro F, Sharma S. Physiology, Alveolar Tension. [Updated 2023 May 1]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-.

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