Whispered Pectoriloquy vector illustration

Whispered Pectoriloquy: A Comprehensive Overview (2024)

by | Updated: Jan 3, 2024

Whispered pectoriloquy is a clinical examination method primarily used in the diagnosis and assessment of respiratory conditions.

This technique involves the patient whispering a phrase while the healthcare provider auscultates their chest with a stethoscope, listening for changes in the clarity and volume of the whispered speech.

An effective and straightforward procedure, whispered pectoriloquy can potentially indicate lung abnormalities such as consolidation, fibrosis, or a mass, making it crucial in the early detection and treatment of various pulmonary diseases.

This article explores the clinical implications, limitations, and practical use of whispered pectoriloquy in the diagnosis and assessment of respiratory disorders.

What is Whispered Pectoriloquy?

Whispered pectoriloquy is a bedside examination method used in the diagnosis and assessment of respiratory problems. During the examination, the patient whispers a phrase while a healthcare provider auscultates their chest with a stethoscope, listening for changes in clarity and volume.

These changes may indicate abnormal lung tissue, such as pneumonia, lung fibrosis, or pleural effusion.

In a normal lung examination, a physician will ask the patient to whisper a phrase or series of words. The examiner then listens to the patient’s chest with a stethoscope. Normally, whispered sounds become faint and indistinct when transmitted through healthy lung tissue due to its air-filled nature and structure.

However, in the presence of fluid or consolidation, these whispered sounds become louder and more clear during auscultation, a phenomenon known as whispered pectoriloquy. The words or phrases that the patient whispered can be heard distinctly, which isn’t the case with healthy lung tissue.

Note: Whispered pectoriloquy isn’t definitive for any specific condition; it’s used as part of the physical examination to provide additional clues to support other findings and guide further testing.

Indications

Whispered pectoriloquy is used in a variety of clinical settings where lung pathology is suspected. This may include, but is not limited to, the following indications:

  • Pneumonia: Pneumonia leads to consolidation of lung tissues. Consolidation enhances the transmission of sounds from the larynx to the chest wall, making whispered sounds more audible.
  • Lung Fibrosis: Fibrotic changes in the lung tissue can also increase the transmission of whispered sounds.
  • Pleural Effusion: While effusion itself might lead to decreased sounds due to fluid presence, in some cases it can cause increased transmission of sound, causing whispered pectoriloquy.
  • Lung Masses or Tumors: Similar to pneumonia, solid masses within the lung parenchyma can enhance the transmission of sounds, making whispered words more audible.
  • Atelectasis: Atelectasis refers to partial or complete collapse of a lung. It leads to denser lung tissue which can enhance sound transmission.
  • Follow-up assessment: Whispered pectoriloquy can be utilized to assess the progress of lung diseases over time, especially after treatment.

Whispered pectoriloquy isn’t definitive for any specific condition. It is an important part of the physical examination and helps provide additional clues to guide further testing or treatment.

It’s also worth noting that the absence of whispered pectoriloquy does not rule out lung pathology. It is one tool in a battery of clinical and diagnostic tests available to healthcare providers.

Clinical Significance

Whispered pectoriloquy carries significant clinical value in the evaluation and diagnosis of various lung conditions.

Its primary purpose is to identify abnormal transmission of sound in the lungs, which may suggest consolidation or other pathological alterations of the lung tissue.

  • Diagnostic Utility: While it is not a specific test for any particular disease, it serves as a part of the physical examination to provide more clues about the patient’s condition. The presence of whispered pectoriloquy can lead a clinician to suspect pathology such as pneumonia, lung fibrosis, lung tumors, or pleural effusions, amongst other conditions. This can aid in guiding further diagnostic steps, such as ordering imaging or microbiological studies.
  • Prognostic Value: In certain cases, whispered pectoriloquy can be used to monitor disease progression or the efficacy of treatment. For instance, the resolution of whispered pectoriloquy may indicate a positive response to treatment in pneumonia.
  • Ease of Use and Cost Effectiveness: Whispered pectoriloquy is an easy-to-use clinical tool that requires no additional equipment beyond a stethoscope, making it highly accessible and cost-effective. It can be performed in a variety of settings, from hospital wards to primary care clinics, and even in home visits.
  • Supplement to Other Investigations: Whispered pectoriloquy is often used in conjunction with other physical examination findings and investigations, such as imaging studies. It can provide additional information about the nature and extent of lung abnormalities, aiding in the creation of a comprehensive clinical picture.

Again, whispered pectoriloquy should be used as a component of a comprehensive diagnostic approach rather than as a standalone definitive test.

How to Perform Whispered Pectoriloquy

Whispered pectoriloquy is a relatively simple procedure to perform and is a part of the routine chest examination. Here are the steps:

  1. Explain the Procedure: First, explain the procedure to the patient. Make sure they understand that they will need to whisper phrases or words as directed while you listen to their chest.
  2. Position the Patient: The patient should be in an upright position, with their chest or back exposed so that the stethoscope can be placed directly on the skin. Make sure the room is quiet enough for you to hear subtle changes in the lung sounds.
  3. Auscultation: With the diaphragm of the stethoscope (the flat side), begin by listening to a ‘normal’ area of the patient’s chest to familiarize yourself with the baseline lung sounds.
  4. Phrase Pronunciation: Ask the patient to whisper a phrase or a series of words such as “ninety-nine” or “one-two-three.” These phrases have been traditionally used because they create a wide range of sound frequencies and are easily distinguishable when they become abnormally clear.
  5. Listening for Changes: While the patient is whispering, listen over different areas of the chest. Move the stethoscope symmetrically over the chest, comparing the same areas on each side. Pay attention to the clarity and volume of the whispered sounds. Normally, the whispered sounds should be faint and indistinct due to the filtering effect of normal, air-filled lung tissue.
  6. Interpretation: If the whispered words are clear and easily heard, it indicates the presence of whispered pectoriloquy. This is a sign of lung consolidation or other lung abnormalities that allow the sound to be transmitted more effectively than through normal lung tissue.
  7. Follow-up: Note down your findings and integrate them with the rest of the clinical picture. Keep in mind, whispered pectoriloquy is a clue to potential pathology, not a definitive diagnosis. Further testing will likely be necessary to confirm a diagnosis.

Remember to maintain patient comfort and privacy throughout the procedure. If abnormalities are found, these should be investigated further with appropriate diagnostic tests.

Doctor performing Whispered Pectoriloquy on patient vector

Interpreting the Results of Whispered Pectoriloquy

The interpretation of whispered pectoriloquy results is based on the clarity and volume of the sounds heard during the test.

  • Normal Result: In a normal lung examination, the patient’s whispered words should sound faint, muffled, and indistinct when listened to through a stethoscope. This is because healthy, air-filled lung tissue doesn’t transmit high-frequency sounds well.
  • Abnormal Result: If the whispered words are clearly audible and easily understood, this indicates an abnormal result. It suggests that the lung tissue or space through which the sound is passing is denser or consolidated. This could be due to a variety of conditions, including pneumonia, lung masses, lung fibrosis, or pleural effusion, among others.

Note: The presence of whispered pectoriloquy is not specific to any single disease but can be a sign of several types of lung pathology. As such, it should not be used in isolation but rather in combination with the patient’s history, other physical exam findings, and possibly further diagnostic testing like imaging or lab work. Furthermore, the absence of whispered pectoriloquy does not rule out lung disease, as some conditions may not produce this phenomenon.

What is Pneumonia?

Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that causes inflammation in the air sacs, also known as alveoli.

This inflammation leads to the filling of the alveoli with fluid or pus, causing symptoms such as cough, fever, chills, and difficulty breathing. Pneumonia can be caused by a variety of organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

It can occur in a variety of settings: community-acquired pneumonia is contracted in everyday life, hospital-acquired pneumonia occurs in hospital settings, and aspiration pneumonia can occur when food, liquid, or vomit is accidentally inhaled into the lungs.

The treatment for pneumonia varies depending on the cause and severity, but often involves antibiotics for bacterial cases.

What is Lung Consolidation?

Lung consolidation refers to a condition in which the lung tissue becomes firm and solid rather than being filled with air, as in a normal lung.

This typically occurs due to an accumulation of fluid, pus, blood, or cells in the alveoli, which are the small air sacs in the lungs where gas exchange occurs.

The most common cause of lung consolidation is pneumonia, although it can also occur in conditions such as lung cancer, pulmonary edema, or lung hemorrhage. On a chest X-ray or CT scan, consolidated lung appears more dense and white compared to normal lung tissue.

Clinically, it can result in findings like increased breath sounds, bronchial breath sounds, egophony, and whispered pectoriloquy on auscultation.

Consolidation can lead to impaired gas exchange and may cause symptoms such as shortness of breath, cough, and chest pain.

What is Bronchophony?

Bronchophony is a clinical sign observed during chest auscultation when the spoken voice of a patient is transmitted clearly and loudly through the lungs to the stethoscope of the examiner.

In a normal lung, spoken voice sounds muffled and indistinct when auscultated. However, in conditions where the lung parenchyma is consolidated, such as in pneumonia or lung tumors, the spoken words can be heard much more clearly.

This enhanced transmission of vocal vibrations is referred to as bronchophony. It’s one among several physical examination tools used to identify lung abnormalities.

What is Egophony?

Egophony is another clinical sign detected through auscultation of the lungs. It is a change in the tone of voice sounds heard when a patient speaks during lung auscultation.

Specifically, when a patient is asked to say “ee,” it is heard as “ay” through the stethoscope, giving it a nasal or bleating quality.

This typically indicates that there is fluid, like in cases of pleural effusion, or consolidation in the lungs. Egophony, like bronchophony and whispered pectoriloquy, is an indicator of potential lung pathology.

However, the presence of these signs should always be correlated with other clinical findings and possibly further diagnostic testing.

Limitations of Whispered Pectoriloquy

While whispered pectoriloquy is a valuable tool in the diagnostic process for various lung conditions, it does come with certain limitations:

  • Specificity and Sensitivity: Whispered pectoriloquy is not 100% sensitive or specific. It is possible for patients with significant lung disease to have a negative whispered pectoriloquy, and conversely, certain normal variations in anatomy or technique may occasionally yield false positives.
  • Dependent on Patient Cooperation: The accuracy of whispered pectoriloquy is reliant on patient cooperation. Some patients may have difficulty understanding or following instructions, especially children or those with cognitive impairments. Additionally, patients with severe respiratory distress may have difficulty speaking.
  • Variability in Interpretation: The interpretation of whispered pectoriloquy can be subjective and can vary among different healthcare providers. Two clinicians might not necessarily agree, adding a potential layer of variability.
  • Confounding Factors: There are other factors that could affect the interpretation of whispered pectoriloquy, such as background noise in the environment, the quality of the stethoscope, or the examiner’s hearing acuity.
  • Non-specific Finding: Whispered pectoriloquy is a non-specific finding. While it suggests lung pathology, it doesn’t point toward a specific diagnosis. Further tests, like imaging or lab work, are often required to confirm a diagnosis.
  • Does not Quantify Disease Severity: While it can indicate the presence of a lung abnormality, whispered pectoriloquy does not provide information on the severity or extent of the disease.

Given these limitations, whispered pectoriloquy is best used in combination with a comprehensive patient history, other physical exam findings, and potentially further diagnostic testing rather than as a standalone test.

FAQs

What is the Primary Indication for Whispered Pectoriloquy?

The primary indication for whispered pectoriloquy is to determine the presence of fluid in the lungs. This is helpful in the diagnosis of conditions such as pneumonia, pleurisy, or emphysema.

What Does Pectoriloquy Mean?

Pectoriloquy is a clinical term derived from Latin; ‘pector’ meaning ‘chest’, and ‘-loquy’ meaning ‘speak’. It refers to the phenomenon where voice sounds are clearly audible over the chest during auscultation.

This is often a sign of abnormal lung conditions, where the consolidation or density of the lung tissue enhances the transmission of sound from the larynx to the chest wall.

How Do You Test for Whispered Pectoriloquy?

Testing for whispered pectoriloquy involves a simple procedure. The patient is asked to whisper a phrase or series of words such as “one-two-three” or “ninety-nine”.

The healthcare provider listens to the patient’s chest using a stethoscope while the patient is whispering. If the whispered words are clear and easily heard, this indicates the presence of whispered pectoriloquy and suggests potential lung pathology.

Where Do You Listen for Whispered Pectoriloquy?

Whispered pectoriloquy is usually listened for over all lung fields, both front and back, in a systematic and symmetrical manner.

This involves starting from the top of the lungs (near the collarbone) and moving the stethoscope downwards while comparing the same areas on each side of the chest.

Particular attention is given to areas where other physical signs may indicate potential lung pathology.

What Is Egophony vs Bronchophony vs Whispered Pectoriloquy?

These are all different types of voice sounds that are assessed during a chest examination, each providing clues to potential lung abnormalities:

  • Egophony is a change in the tone of voice sounds, where when a patient says “ee”, it is heard as “ay” through the stethoscope. This often indicates the presence of fluid or consolidation in the lungs.
  • Bronchophony refers to the phenomenon where the spoken voice of the patient is transmitted more clearly and loudly through the lungs to the stethoscope of the examiner. This typically suggests consolidation of lung tissue.
  • Whispered Pectoriloquy refers to the clear and loud hearing of whispered words, instead of them being faint and muffled as in normal lungs. Like bronchophony, this is often a sign of lung consolidation or other lung abnormalities that allow the sound to be transmitted more effectively than through normal lung tissue.

What Does a Positive Bronchophony Test Mean?

A positive bronchophony test occurs when a patient’s spoken words are heard more clearly and loudly through the stethoscope during chest auscultation.

Normally, the spoken voice should sound muffled and indistinct. If the voice sounds loud and clear, it’s typically due to the increased density of the lung tissue, as seen in conditions like pneumonia, lung tumors, or lung fibrosis.

This enhanced transmission of voice sounds, known as bronchophony, is a sign of potential lung pathology. However, further diagnostic testing is usually necessary to confirm a specific diagnosis.

What Does a Positive Egophony Test Indicate?

A positive egophony test, or ‘E-to-A’ change, occurs when the patient’s spoken “ee” sounds like “ay” when auscultated over the chest. This change, giving the voice a nasal or bleating quality, often indicates the presence of fluid or consolidation in the lungs.

This could be due to conditions such as pneumonia, pleural effusion, or lung tumors.

However, as with other auscultatory findings, egophony should be considered in the broader context of the patient’s clinical presentation and additional diagnostic tests may be needed for a definitive diagnosis.

What Are the Normal Findings of Whispered Pectoriloquy?

Normal findings during a whispered pectoriloquy test are when a patient’s whispered words sound faint, muffled, and indistinct when listened to through a stethoscope.

This is due to the fact that healthy, air-filled lung tissue doesn’t transmit high-frequency sounds well. If the whispered words are clear and easily heard, it indicates an abnormal result, suggesting potential lung pathologies such as consolidation or other abnormalities in the lungs.

Final Thoughts

Whispered pectoriloquy is a valuable tool in the hands of clinicians, aiding in the detection of lung pathology.

As a part of the physical examination, it allows the practitioner to leverage simple patient voice sounds to gain insights about the state of the lung tissue.

Despite its limitations in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and reliance on patient cooperation, whispered pectoriloquy remains a relevant and useful screening test for identifying conditions like lung consolidation.

This simple, noninvasive method adds significant value to the diagnostic process, helping guide further investigations and management.

However, it’s critical to remember that its findings should always be interpreted in the broader context of the patient’s clinical picture, and in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and procedures, for the most accurate and effective patient care.

Written by:

John Landry, BS, RRT

John Landry is a registered respiratory therapist from Memphis, TN, and has a bachelor's degree in kinesiology. He enjoys using evidence-based research to help others breathe easier and live a healthier life.

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